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ANSWERING QUESTIONS ABOUT DEPRESSION

An Interview with Dr. Stephen Farra   I interviewed a colleague who helped develop the Psychology Program at Columbia International University, Steve Farra. Steve has extensive practical experience in counseling and psychotherapy, as well as top-notch academic credentials. (See his bio at the end of the interview.)  He will help you better understand the nature of and treatments for depression.  Here are questions I asked him, and his responses.   What are the most common forms of depression?  It is important to distinguish between temporary distress (from life events), and true depression (which is more an on-going state of mind/brain, and is typically longer lasting and more severe).  There are several sub-categories of true depression, including forms that are primarily psychological/cognitive in nature (produced by relentless toxic or negative self-talk), and full major depression that involves imbalances and shortages of neurotransmitters in the brain–primarily serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine.  Full-blown major depression can appear with or without “delusions” in the form of grossly distorted and false beliefs.   What is the difference between depression spawned by a loss (unemployment, death of a loved one) and ongoing, recurring bouts of serious depression?   Grief is not depression, but great loss can lead to …

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One Weapon To Wield When Combating Depression

The Life-Changing Effects of Gratitude   A good book informs you. A great book forms you. Why do I consider Nancy Demoss Wolgemuth’s Choosing Gratitude a great book?  Because its content is wedging its way into my daily consciousness and is in the fetal stages of making an observable difference in my life. Typically, depression spawns negative thought patterns: self-condemnation over imperfections; hopelessness concerning the future; doubts about core beliefs, and a greater vulnerability to complaining about inconveniences and frustrating circumstances. Though we can’t always prevent the onset of depression, God has given us as Christians the capacity to manage our responses to despondency.   What Describes Choosing Gratitude? *Biblical   Every chapter teems with principles and specific verses from God’s Word. Some pages appear to have bloodstains because Nancy “bleeds Bible” and uses it for her primary insights on gratitude. *Anecdotal   Attention-grabbing stories, showing both a thankful spirit and ingratitude, dot the pages. *Applicable   Repeatedly, Nancy links a point she makes to typical daily experiences of her readers.  She understands the human heart and the obstacles that try to eclipse a thankful spirit. *Devotional   Nancy ends her book with a 55-page 30-day devotional guide.  Each day’s reading employs a different …

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How Can A Spouse Help with Depression?

What a husband or wife does or says in relation to a depressed spouse can either exacerbate the symptoms or help relieve them. Dolly, my bride of over 46 years, doesn’t understand depression experientially. She’s optimistic, outgoing. Her emotions stay on an even keel. She handles setbacks with simple faith in a loving God. Whether it’s in response to a comic strip, a humorous pet video someone sends her on social media, or part of a phone conversation, her laughter reverberates daily off the walls inside our house. What a priceless wife! And despite her inexperience with depression, she’s wise and sensitive in how she handles my bouts with the darkness. If you’re a spouse of a depression-prone person, learn from one or more of these four reactions that describe her.   1. She lets me know that she’s praying for me. When she knows I’ve had consecutive dark days, I often get a short but inspiring message on my phone at work. “Just want you to know I love you, Babe, and I’m praying for you today.” In his book Prayer: Finding the Heart’s True Home, Richard Foster wrote, “Somtimes people have needs that we cannot personally meet. That’s …

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A DOGGONE GOOD IDEA FOR DEPRESSION-PRONE PEOPLE

The Value of a Dog in Coping with Depression The lot on which my house sits is relatively level, but some days, as I walk from the driveway to the entrance, it feels like I’m trudging uphill with a weight on my shoulders. The figurative weight of a depressed spirt seems real enough, causing a slower-than-normal gait. But the second I open the kitchen door, it happens. Farley, My 10-year-old dachshund, greets me with a high-pitched whine of pure elation, his tail thumping loudly and rapidly against the counter, his short legs trying to climb up to me. He’s never satisfied with warm words or a pat on the head. No, the required ritual is for me to hoist him to my eye level, snuggle our heads together, kiss his cheeks, then allowing him to give my face a fresh (?) bath with his tongue. If I don’t complete every phase of the ritual, he dogs my steps until I do. (I couldn’t resist the pun.) For at least a few minutes, his greeting assuages my despair. I know without a doubt I’m loved and treasured. How does a dog help with depression? Physical touch. Who doesn’t need to feel …